On the Importance of Attending the Evening Divine Services

by Mitred Archpriest Valery Lukianov Man’s life is a chain of alternating links of labor and rest. There are always more men who love repose than those who prefer labor. And, true, it is characteristic of human nature to strive more for consolation than for labor. Thus, man loves the beauty of the body; he […]

On Contempt For Divine Truth

by Pope St. Gelasius I (d. 496) We have noted with vexation that contempt for divine truths has reached such a level that even women, it is reported, serve at the holy altars. Everything that is entrusted exclusively to men is performed by the sex that has no right to do so. And of all these […]

Orthodox Worship As A School Of Theology: Part Five

by Metropolitan Hilarion Alfeyev Lecture delivered at the Kiev Theological Academy on September 20, 2002 The Divine Liturgy Some of my non-Orthodox friends complain that the Orthodox Liturgy is too long, saying “why do you have to stretch out the Eucharist when you can serve it in half an hour?” My experience of the Liturgy […]

Orthodox Worship As A School Of Theology: Part One

by Metropolitan Hilarion Alfeyev Lecture delivered at the Kiev Theological Academy on September 20, 2002 All of our liturgical hymns are instructive, profound and sublime. They contain the whole of our theology and moral teaching, give us Christian consolation and instill in us a fear of the Judgment. He who listens to them attentively has […]

The Concept of Divine Energies

by David Bradshaw, University of Kentucky Anyone familiar with the history of western philosophy is aware of how large a role has been played within it by theology. This is true not only of the Middle Ages, when philosophy was the handmaiden of theology, but as recently as Hegel and Kierkegaard, or arguably even Heidegger […]

The Trinity in the Writings of Ignatius of Antioch

It’s a bit anachronistic to speak of St. Ignatius of Antioch (died about 117 A.D.) and Trinitarian theology as the doctrine of the Trinity developed in the first centuries of Christianity and its associated terminology was finalized in the third and fourth centuries as a reflection of the realities it had experienced. J.N.D. Kelly explains […]